Appealing to Generations as an Independent Party

In democracy, effective governance, independence, independence party, leadership, social responsibility by ZenLeave a Comment

How is the Independent Party positioned?

First of all, we seek to make sense common. We want to appeal to generations, all of them. What do we mean by that? Sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity has kept us from learning how to work together toward common benefits, resources and services that make life sustainable for all of us.

We seek to represent the future solutions to our most pressing problems, those that are obvious to everyone – conservative and liberal alike – and serve our population best. Sure, there are community-specific issues. The State-wide issues include cleaner air, better education and teacher pay, cannabis/hemp use and production, clean energy production, agricultural/water resources, health care for all and small business development that creates jobs.

We face different challenges in the 21st century and need to make adjustments to create solutions. The two-party system is bogged down in old paradigms and, quite frankly, paradigm paralysis. The political machines are like huge corporations that are running on their own inertia in spite of poor fiscal and resource management. No major changes can happen in those kinds of organizations or systems. We need to build something new, following Socrates wise counsel – The secret to change is to focus all of your energy, not on fighting the old, but on building the new.

According to the PEW Research Center, the perceived wide ideological divide might just offer the opportunity to unite citizens who are tired of the two-party system and it’s inherent polarization factors. The Independent Party of Arizona moves beyond these polarizing factors with a new ideology; the integrated assertions, theories and aims that constitute a sociopolitical program. Making Sense Common unites people across diverse cultures. We all want the same basic things – clean air and energy production, meaningful education, healthy food, good jobs and necessary health care for all.

There are now four generations working along side each other, with mixed ideologies, that are challenged to find commonality. Small businesses are finding solutions and acting upon them quicker than large corporations, which gives the booming small business development in Arizona an opportunity to be an example to the Nation. We want you to be a part of that and show you how. Imagine being a great grandfather or grandmother working alongside those young enough to be your great grandchildren.

What would bridge the gaps in your ideological differences? Things that matter – common goals, objectives and processes that utilize each generation’s ability to perform at peak levels in service to their collective mission and vision. Facilitating the building of bridges and processes that utilize best practices in our sociopolitical platform and program are what the Independent Party of Arizona is about today.

Since the Independent Party of Arizona is not currently recognized by the State, we have the opportunity to create a platform that is consistent with Making Sense Common and brings people together from all walks of life to share in making our State better for everyone. We’ll seek local leadership who’ve proven themselves to be of the highest ethical standards and moral behavior personally and professionally and invite them to be the leaders of the future, supported by the communities they served. Expensive campaigns will be a thing of the past. The people will speak. We have strength in numbers.

We’ve seen how effective social media campaigns can be in generating interest and opportunity for engagement. Millennials are the great hope, the largest generation leading the way in technology development and implementation. They want change and have the means to facilitate it, but they lack direction and focus.

“We’re less interested in big government vs. small government than we are in better government—making our democratic systems more inclusive and more responsive,” wrote the authors of Government By and For Millennials, a 2013 report from the Roosevelt Institute. While the notorious opacity of government spending drives most millennials away, it’s not a death knell for democracy so much as a call-to-action for government to re-engage millennials.

Gen Xers are better educated, yet slow to act in relation to the needs of the many unless they are personally affected. This generation is in a key position to learn how to apply the material resources, they’ve become so adept at acquiring, toward goals and objectives that make the world better for them.

From The Atlantic – Xers are facing a particularly acute economic insecurity, which leads them to turn inward and pursue material well-being above all else. They see the outlines of very real problems ahead—fiscal, social, and environmental. But in the nation’s political system they perceive no leadership on the issues that concern them; rather, they see self-serving politicians who continually indenture themselves to the highest bidders. So Xers have decided, for now, to tune out. After all, they ask, what’s the point?

Boomers, the second largest generation in population, are at the crux of the matter. They are in power now, but not necessarily wielding it wisely. The generation that both fought and protested simultaneously is still divided in their political behavior, yet tend to lean toward conservatism. Is there something, some key feature of a new way, that would bridge the gaps of conservatives and liberals?

Some sociologists have observed that youth culture of the 1960s wasn’t so much a rebellion against our parents’ values as it was a cry out for society to literally and completely follow values of democracy and egalitarianism, ones that the World War II generation fought for in battle and after the Great Depression.

The Independent Party of Arizona, in making sense common, bridges the conservative and liberal chasm. How? We focus on developing a holistic system that empowers the people to solve problems and engages the government’s resources to do so, a far more effective collaboration that utilizes the service to self and service to others aspects of human dynamics.

Through skilled leadership we simply learn to work together better.

 

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